Is Your Water Line Frozen? Refrigerator Fixes 101

So, your refrigerator water line is frozen.

First off, how do you know this?

When your ice maker isn’t producing ice anymore, or your ice cubes are being pumped out in miniature size, chances are your refrigerator’s water line has frozen over.

Fear not! Thawing out frozen water lines is a common – yet simple repair that you can manage yourself with simple household tools.

This blog will show you how to fix your ice maker water line – in no time!

What is a Refrigerator Water Line?

Before diving into our how-to, it’s beneficial to understand the components of the appliance you’re working with to help implement a smooth and stress-free fix.

Most new refrigerators come with a hose to run a water line – similar to your home’s laundry hookups to your washing machine.

These modern refrigerators make ice on their own. These water lines are present so that the refrigerator can access water needed to create ice and provide dispensable water.

While old refrigerators often lacked a water line, you may find that most new ones come with a connector and hose to run a water line, much like you would from your home’s laundry hookups to a washing machine. A look at the varied functions of modern refrigerators explains the need for a water line.

When you push the ice dispenser lever on your refrigerator, the refrigerator gathers the exact amount of water needed to create the ice cubes your Luke-warm beverage is pining for.

These modern refrigerators continue making ice cubes in bulk after you have dispensed your ice cubes – as long as the ice maker is on the “on” position.

Water lines are vital to this process. They transfer the required water to the refrigerator so that it can do its job and produce ice.

 

8 Steps on How to Fix Frozen Refrigerator Water Line

Finally, we’re at the meat!

If your ice maker has stopped making ice, or is producing smaller ice cubes than normal, it’s time to check the water line, and if frozen, defrost it!

Step 1:

Empty contents of the freezer into a cooler of your choice. Make sure this cooler or contained is insulated and large enough to fit all your frozen items. Then, dump out the remaining ice cubs from the ice bucket in the freezer, into the sink.

Step 2:

Drag the refrigerator away from your wall so that you have access to its electrical cord and water supply valve. Next, unplug the refrigerator from the outlet and switch off the water supply valve.

Step 3:

Loosen up either the two screws or two bolts which are holding your icemaker to the inner wall of your freezer. Typically, this icemaker is held up to the wall by a couple brackets. Once loosening the two bolts or screws, pull the icemaker up to release it from the fasteners.

Step 4:

Next, squeeze and pull two sides of the wire harness that connects the icemaker to the freezer wall. Then, pull the harness away from the wall of the freezer in order to take the icemaker off. Place this icemaker onto a towel, somewhere safe.

Step 5:

Plug in a hair dryer near your refrigerator. NOTE: Make sure you clean out all the ice from the ceiling of the freezer. When it’s inside the freezer, keep your hair dryer level so that any freezer water droplets don’t drip on the back of the hair dryer.

Switch the hair dryer onto the highest setting. Position the hair dryer close to the icemaker’s fill-tube. This fill-tube pops up from the far back wall of the freezer.

Make sure to hold up the hair dryer so that it’s level while inside of the freezer in case any water drips into the back of the hair dryer.

Turn the hair dryer onto the highest setting. Next, put it close to the icemaker’s fill-tube. You’ll see the fill-tube popping out from the freezer’s back wall.

Hold up the dryer close to the full-tube until water begins dripping from the tube and excess ice drops into the freezer.

Step 6:

Reconnect the harness from the ice maker to the freezer’s back wall. Then, hang up the ice maker onto the screws on the wall. Tighten screws and secure.

Step 7:

Push your ice bucket into your freezer once again. Turn on the water supply valve and re-plug the refrigerator’s power cord.

Reposition the refrigerator back in its position against the wall. Reload your freezer with its contents from your cooler.

Step 8:

Check your freezer’s thermostat to make sure it reads between 0-5 degrees F. Frozen water lines are commonly due to low thermostat temperatures.

Frozen Water Line 101: Summary

Appliances can be complicated – and with so much reliance on them, issues that arise can be more than frustrating. That being said, DIY refrigeration fixes can be easy and safe if you follow the right instructions. Have any other frozen water line solutions? Let us know!

Feature image via Salmaun

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